A literary analysis of a valediction forbidding mourning by john donne

This represents the type of goodbye that is very emotional and noticeable, the opposite of what Donne wants.

a valediction forbidding mourning metaphysical conceit

He was passionately in love with his wife Anne Moore; therefore, when he said final good-bye to his wife, tears came in her eyes.

He hates the lowly love of humans. This metaphor is used to say what a goodbye should not be like. Coincidentally, the compass, representing the lovers, forms a perfect circle, showing the perfect love, which the lovers form.

Such men expire so peacefully that their friends cannot determine when they are truly dead.

A valediction forbidding mourning critical analysis

The speaker continues to reassure his love by developing the qualities that make the love they share capable of enduring a separation. In absence of his beloved, passion of love will not decrease; rather it will increases day-by-day. Such men expire so peacefully that their friends cannot determine when they are truly dead. The point is that they are spiritually bound together regardless of the earthly distance between them. Earthquakes cause great destruction and create great wonder and confusion among human beings. Donne has used a metaphysical conceit in stanzas seven to nine where he compares his spiritual and holy love with the hands of a compass. The first two lines of the stanza discuss how man fears earthquakes. People react to this period of separation in a number of ways.

Instead, the goodbye in a relationship of true love should be quiet and not too noticeable. Donne in indirect words wants to say that virtuous people has no fear of death; they face it and accept it openheartedly.

A valediction forbidding mourning theme

Indeed, the separation merely adds to the distance covered by their love, like a sheet of gold, hammered so thin that it covers a huge area and gilds so much more than a love concentrated in one place ever could. Some cry, some smile, and some do nothing. Stanza: A stanza is a poetic form of some lines. They can be separated and their love can continue to remain strong. The final three stanzas use an extended metaphor in which Donne compares the two individuals in the marriage to the two legs of a compass: though they each have their own purpose, they are inextricably linked at the joint or pivot at the top—that is, in their spiritual unity in God. Such men expire so peacefully that their friends cannot determine when they are truly dead. They are a team, and so long as she is true to him, he will be able to return to exactly the point where they left off before his journey.

The third stanza suggests that the separation is like the innocent movement of the heavenly spheres, many of which revolve around the center. However, Donne and his beloved love each other spiritually as well as physically.

a valediction forbidding mourning critical analysis line by line

He begins by stating that the virtuous man leaves life behind so delicately that even his friends cannot clearly tell the difference. Donne is going somewhere in France but definitely, he will return and that moment will be the happiest moment for his beloved.

A valediction forbidding mourning as a metaphysical poem

Therefore, mourning is inappropriate when souls are attached for good. Donne is going somewhere in France but definitely, he will return and that moment will be the happiest moment for his beloved. The speaker is about to take a long journey so says good bye valediction to the woman he loves, telling her not to feel sad and cry forbidding mourning. It is thought that Donne was in fact leaving for a long journey and wished to console and encourage his beloved wife by identifying the true strength of their bond. So this is how you will be to me, as I move away from you: you will remain here but move aslant in line with the direction I travel. Thereby, instead of going away, he will come closer to his beloved. Physical separation, thus, does not matter in his love because it is not physical. Therefore, when such lovers separate, they remove from each other the very basis of their love, which changes and fades like the moon. Donne says that for lowly worldly people, separation is a difficult task but for spiritual-lovers, it is not. The metaphor of the gold demonstrates this fact as well. For he was a metaphysical poet, we witness such elements in his poems as well.

These are nine stanzas in this poem with four lines in each stanza. Donne uses the metaphor of storms to describe the flood of emotions that usually bring crying and tears from two lovers.

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A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning Analysis